Headshot

© Jeff Swinger

Danrich, who wrote this show, shines as its sun, and not just because of her gorgeous singing. Her passion for that admirable group of black Harlem artists and intellectuals, some famous and some forgotten, came through in her body language and in every word and note.
Entire Review

Reviews

Shining Her Light…and Rocking the House

“It’s great to sing operatic roles like Aida or Donna Anna, but when I’ve done outreach work, those are the best, most honest audiences I’ve ever had,” says soprano Adrienne Danrich, whose voice has been described as “fresh liquid silver” by Opera News.

Adrienne Danrich’s Harlem Renaissance in Milwaukee

Danrich, who wrote this show, shines as its sun, and not just because of her gorgeous singing. Her passion for that admirable group of black Harlem artists and intellectuals, some famous and some forgotten, came through in her body language and in every word and note.

Adrienne Danrich: Entrepreneur Diva at UWM

Third Coast Digest

http://thirdcoastdigest.com
February 23th, 2012, By Tom Strini

Soprano Adrienne Danrich, who will appear at UWM Saturday, sings the old-fashioned way, with opera companies around the country: Assorted Mozart roles (Pamina and Countess Almaviva, especially) in San Antonio, Kentucky,  Sarasota and more.…

Amsterdam News

Casting ribbons of sound-sometimes with charming delicacy, sometimes with full-throttle spinto lyricism-she engaged us in a history through little lessons, reflections and poetry of the era set to music.

She’s gonna let it shine

That voice. Danrich’s spinto soprano is deep, expansive and powerful. She was stunning in arias from Puccini’s Turandot and Madame Butterfly, and she is a skilled interpreter of spirituals. Her excitement for and commitment to the music is palpable.

Evans Mirageas

Adrienne Danrich captured the essence of the personalities and artistry of these two great artist/pioneers Marian Anderson and Leontyne Price. Her storytelling ability and the beauty of her voice combined to bring the accomplishments of these great women to audiences that will never hear them ‘live’.